Dan & Tabitha’s Wedding

Last year, when I launched the kickstarter for Austin Phonograph Company, one of the first couples who backed the project were Dan and Tabitha. They got married last weekend in Austin in a lovely 1920s style ceremony, complete with Paper Moon photo booth, flapper dress, and my pals in The White Ghost Shivers performed after the cake was cut! Here are some of their engagement photos taken at my favorite bar, East Side Show Room. Photos by Julie Cope:

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148508_10101063010505517_1777757854_nThe wedding day at Women’s Federation Hall:

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Here is what my phonograph set up looked like:
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Violinophone & Poppies


Here’s a fancy little get-up starring a darling dress that I scored for free at a clothing swap about a year ago. It’s a crepe-like material with a sheer striped panel on the bust. After 75ish years, I love that these garments can still be in such incredible condition. There are only a few snags & holes, which never really bothers me. Perfection in vintage is only a temporary state, anyway.
The unbearable heat of 100+ days of temperatures over 100F has finally broken! While it’s still very very warm, I’m looking forward to fall, which can only be around the corner. I’m not quite to the point of unpacking my berets & sweaters, but I’m thankful to have the chill of 70 degree evenings.

Black lace headband with 1920s embellishments – Louise Black
1930s poppy dress – clothing swap
1960s? floral tapestry purse – Buffalo Exchange
Pointed black shoes – traded with a friend

This headband has beaded details that hang down and make tinkly sounds in my ear. I’m test driving So Chaud lipstick from MAC, an orange lipstick that straddles a thin line between avant guard & old lady chic.

The newest franken-project involves Reese retrofitting my gigantic phonograph bell to a Stroh violin. We wheeled this monster horn through the hardware store testing out fittings & tubes.

Photo from Wikipedia
The Stroh violin, also called a violinophone, was used a lot in early days of phonographic recording, as the sound is multi-directional and thus was better received by the acoustic-mechanical recording method of the early 1920s. The Stroh has a phonograph reproducer in the body. When played, the strings over the wooden bridge vibrate a tiny nail connected to the metal reproducer below and projects the sound through a trumpet shaped plug-in.

Victor Orchestra as it looked in 1925 with Stroh violins and cello on a riser.

The newly-born circus horn made a test run at the White Ghost Shivers show last night. It looked so neat on stage! Reese has a few more adjustments to make, but we were so pleased that it was SO loud on the test run! Also, it was mistaken as a beer bong on more than one occasion. Please, nobody drink beer through this thing. I’m sure the 100 years of dust and metals would render one hell of a hangover.